88067 - ADVANCED ENGLISH II

Scheda insegnamento

Anno Accademico 2019/2020

Conoscenze e abilità da conseguire

At the end of the course the student can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts in the specialized fields of international relations, and recognise implicit meaning. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously on topics of current affairs and diplomacy. Can use language flexibly and effectively for academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed texts on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.

Programma/Contenuti

Aims

Students will gain hands-on understanding of formal features of academic writing. The aim of the course is to enable students to learn to write clear and precise English. We will commence with an analysis of the structure of an essay and explore academic register though a variety of types of written academic texts, both informative and argumentative. Students will then practice in the writing of essays - assignments will be given weekly and the essays will be corrected in the hours dedicated to tutoring.

Learning outcome

Ideal level C1. Students should be able to follow a lesson in English, to read a complex text and make a fluent oral report on it. Moreover, they should be capable of writing an essay in grammatically correct and well-organized English.

Course contents

The course is composed of 40 hours of lesson.

The following topics will be covered:

  • Structuring an essay
  • Describing
  • Comparing
  • Reporting on complex issues
  • Making an argument

Testi/Bibliografia

Primary resource for the course is the course workbook, which will be uploaded on the IOL platform.

A monolingual dictionary, such as:

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

The Collins Cobuild English Language Dictionary

The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

The monolingual dictionary (as well as a thesaurus) will be allowed during exams.

Students may use a bilingual dictionary, for example:

l Ragazzini. Dizionario inglese-italiano, italiano-inglese. Bologna. Zanichelli

Bilingual dictionaries, however, will not be allowed during exams.

General reading (see programme for the oral exam).

Metodi didattici

The students will practice writing descriptive, comparative and argumentative texts, and they will work on developing essay ideas and organising them effectively, using academic language.

Throughout the course electronic corpora will be employed as a resource for data-driven learning, also called “active learning” or “discovery learning”. The students will be assisted and encouraged to use corpora to discover and check facts about language. Teaching with corpora and about corpora is teaching autonomous learning: learners are given the tools to infer grammatical rules, test hypotheses, analyse mistakes, expand vocabulary and in general develop linguistic awareness and competence in the production of particular text types.

Time will be dedicated to the discussion of work produced by the students and there will be tutoring hours for the correction of students’ essays.

Modalità di verifica dell'apprendimento

A mid-term written test during which students will be expected to write a comparison between countries (on the basis of geographic, economic and political data), or between groups/situations (on the basis of survey data), or between people (on the basis of biographical data).

A final written test, during which students will have to write an essay, choosing between an argumentative text and an informative report.

Oral skills will be tested by means of a discussion of one chapter chosen among the options below.

Chapters:

INTRODUCTION + 1 chapter of your choice from Deborah Cameron (2019) Feminism. London: Profile Books.

INTRODUCTION + 1 chapter of your choice from Danny Dorling & Carl Lee (2016) Geography. London: Profile Books.

WHAT IS CITIZENSHIP, AND WHY DOES IT MATTER? + 1 chapter of your choice from Richard Bellamy (2008) Citizenship. A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

LOOKING AT RIGHTS + 1 chapter of your choice from Andrew Clapham (2007) Human Rights. A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

ORIGINS + 1 chapter of your choice from Andrew Dobson (2016) Environmental Politics. A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

WHAT IS A REVOLUTION? + 1 chapter of your choice from Jack A. Goldstone (2014) Revolutions. A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

STUDENTS WHO DO NOT ATTEND THE COURSE CAN SIT THE EXAM WITH THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMME.

A written exam, during which students will have to write an essay on the basis of raw material (maps, data, factsheets, etc.).

An oral exam, during which students will have to give a presentation on a topic (10 to 15 minutes) on the basis of one of the following short books (the whole book):

  • Deborah Cameron (2019) Feminism. London: Profile Books.
  • Danny Dorling & Carl Lee (2016) Geography. London: Profile Books.
  • Richard Bellamy (2008) Citizenship. A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Andrew Clapham (2007) Human Rights. A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Andrew Dobson (2016) Environmental Politics. A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Jack A. Goldstone (2014) Revolutions. A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Orario di ricevimento

Consulta il sito web di Anna Marchi