91210 - VALUTAZIONE DELLE POLITICHE PUBBLICHE

Course Unit Page

  • Teacher Loris Vergolini

  • Credits 8

  • SSD SPS/04

  • Teaching Mode Traditional lectures

  • Language Italian

  • Campus of Bologna

  • Degree Programme Second cycle degree programme (LM) in Politics Administration and Organization (cod. 9085)

    Also valid for Second cycle degree programme (LM) in Local and Global Development (cod. 9200)

  • Course Timetable from Feb 23, 2022 to May 04, 2022

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Quality education Reduced inequalities

Academic Year 2021/2022

Learning outcomes

The course aims to provide in-depth knowledge about the main strategies aimed at evaluating the impact of public policies, deepening both theoretical and methodological aspects. At the end of the course, the student is able: a) to understand the logic of the main impact evaluation designs; b) to use evaluation results to inform policy making; c) to identify the most suitable evaluation designs for identifying causal effects of policies in different practical situations; d) to critically evaluate existing studies and discuss the validity of the results, the limitations, and their transferability to other contexts.

Course contents

The lectures are organised as follow:

Lessons1-2: Course introduction and description of the objectives of impact evaluation.

Lessons 3-4: Systematic approach; process evaluation, introduction to the causal inference and to the potential outcomes language.

Lessons 5-12: Identification strategies: randomised controlled trials, propensity score matching, regression discontinuity design, difference-in-differences, instrumental variables.

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Lezione 13: The evaluation of educational policies (part 1): compulsory schooling

Battistin, E., & Meroni, E. C. (2016). Should we increase instruction time in low achieving schools? Evidence from Southern Italy. Economics of Education Review, 55, 39-56.

De Poli, S., Vergolini, L., & Zanini, N. (2014). L'impatto dei programmi di studio all'estero. Evidenze da un disegno sperimentale. Scuola democratica, (3), 549-576.

Lezione 14: The evaluation of educational policies (part 2): tertiary education

Martini, A., Azzolini, D., Romano, B., & Vergolini, L. (2021). Increasing College Going by Incentivizing Savings: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Italy. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, 40(3), 814-840.

Modena, F., Rettore, E., & Tanzi, G. M. (2020). The effect of grants on university dropout rates: Evidence from the Italian case. Journal of Human Capital, 14(3), 343-370.

Lesson 15:The evaluation of labour market policies

Costabella, L. M. (2017). Do high school graduates benefit from intensive vocational training?. International Journal of Manpower, 38(5), 746-764.

Pomatto, G., Poy, S., & Niccolò, A. (2021). Politiche attive del lavoro ed effetti occupazionali Il caso del Buono per servizi al lavoro della Regione Piemonte. Rivista Italiana di Politiche Pubbliche, 16(2), 259-293.

Lesson 16:The evaluation of school reforms

Cappellari, L., & Lucifora, C. (2009). The “Bologna Process” and college enrollment decisions. Labour economics, 16(6), 638-647.

Meghir, C., & Palme, M. (2005). Educational reform, ability, and family background. American Economic Review, 95(1), 414-424.

Lesson 17: The evaluation of the policies to fight gender inequalities

Bagues, M., Sylos-Labini, M., & Zinovyeva, N. (2017). Does the gender composition of scientific committees matter?. American Economic Review, 107(4), 1207-38.

De Paola, M., Ponzo, M., & Scoppa, V. (2017). Gender differences in the propensity to apply for promotion: evidence from the Italian Scientific Qualification. Oxford Economic Papers, 69(4), 986-1009.

Lesson 18: The evaluation of policies concerning ethnic inequalities

Pinotti, P. (2017). Clicking on heaven's door: The effect of immigrant legalization on crime. American Economic Review, 107(1), 138-68.

Jensen, P., & Rasmussen, A. W. (2011). The effect of immigrant concentration in schools on native and immigrant children's reading and math skills. Economics of Education Review, 30(6), 1503-1515.

Lessons 19:The evaluation of policies to fight poverty in Western Europe

Schizzerotto, Vergolini, Zanini (2014) La valutazione degli effetti di una misura locale contro la povertà: il Reddito di Garanzia in provincia di Trento, in Rassegna italiana di valutazione, 58,132-164

Zantomio, F. (2015). The Route to Take‐up: Evidence from the UK Pension Credit Reform. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 77(5), 719-739.

Lesson 20: The evaluation of policies to fight poverty in developing countries

Banerjee, A., Duflo, E., Glennerster, R., & Kinnan, C. (2015). The miracle of microfinance? Evidence from a randomized evaluation. American economic journal: Applied economics, 7(1), 22-53.

Hoddinott, J., & Skoufias, E. (2004). The impact of PROGRESA on food consumption. Economic development and cultural change, 53(1), 37-61.

The lecturer reserves the right to modify the readings list before the beginning of the course.

Readings/Bibliography

Attending students:

Martini, A., & Sisti, M. (2009). Valutare il successo delle politiche pubbliche. Bologna: Il Mulino.

Papers listed in the section "Course contents" available on virtual.

 

Optional readings, useful for choosing the theme of the research note:

Angrist, J. D., & Pischke, J. S. (2014). Mastering'metrics: The path from cause to effect. Princeton: Princeton university press.

De Blasio, G., Nicita, A., & Pammolli F. (a cura di) (2021). Evidence-based Policy! Ovvero perché politiche pubbliche basate sull'evidenza empirica rendono migliore l’Italia. Bologna: Il Mulino.

Gertler, P. J., Martinez, S., Premand, P., Rawlings, L. B., & Vermeersch, C. M. (2016). Impact evaluation in practice. Washington: The World Bank.

https://www.worldbank.org/en/programs/sief-trust-fund/publication/impact-evaluation-in-practice

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By March 8, 2022, attending students must register at https://forms.office.com/r/zXh21ky87A.

From the fifth lecture (March 9, 2022), the roll call will be taken.

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Non-attending students:

Textbook:

Martini, A., & Sisti, M. (2009). Valutare il successo delle politiche pubbliche. Bologna: Il Mulino.

Additional readings:

De Blasio, G., Nicita, A., & Pammolli F. (a cura di) (2021). Evidence-based Policy! Ovvero perché politiche pubbliche basate sull'evidenza empirica rendono migliore l’Italia. Bologna: Il Mulino.

Articoli di approfondimento relativi al tema del diritto allo studio:

Martini, A., Azzolini, D., Romano, B., & Vergolini, L. (2021). Increasing College Going by Incentivizing Savings: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Italy. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, 40(3), 814-840.

Modena, F., Rettore, E., & Tanzi, G. M. (2020). The effect of grants on university dropout rates: Evidence from the Italian case. Journal of Human Capital, 14(3), 343-370.

Facchini, M., Triventi, M., & Vergolini, L. (2021). Do grants improve the outcomes of university students in a challenging context? Evidence from a matching approach. Higher Education, 81(5), 917-934.

Vergolini, L., & Zanini, N. (2015). Away, but not too far from home. The effects of financial aid on university enrolment decisions. Economics of Education Review, 49, 91-109.

Teaching methods

The first 12 lessons will be carried out in a traditional way with the aim of providing the conceptual and methodological tools necessary to face the second part of the course.

The second part of the course (lessons 13-20) aims to analyze the results of evaluation studies in specific policy areas in order to deepen the knowledge acquired in the first part of the course.

During the second part of the course, students will be asked to present the papers listed in the "Course contents" section. To participate it is needed the reading of the main textbook and of the papers.

The schedule of presentations will be organised during the first two weeks of class.

Assessment methods

The final grade for the attending students will be calculated as follow:

  • Presentation and class participation: 25%.
  • Research note of about 2.000 words: 45%.
  • Oral examination on the topics covered in the first part of the course (lessons 1-12): 30%.

In order to obtatin the status of attending students you must attend at least the 80% of the classes in both parts. This means 9 lessons in the first part and 6 in the second one.

For non-attending students, the exam will be based on an oral exams on the reading listed in the bibliography.

Please note that exam modes may be subject to change according to the health emergency.

Candidates who pass the exam can refuse the final grade (thus requesting to re-take the exam) only once, in accordance with the university’s teaching regulations (art. 16, comma 5).

After having rejected a passing mark, any other subsequent passing mark will be recorded definitively in candidates’ transcripts.


Teaching tools

Teaching material uploaded on virtual

Office hours

See the website of Loris Vergolini