74833 - Education Systems and Policies

Course Unit Page

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Quality education Gender equality Reduced inequalities

Academic Year 2021/2022

Learning outcomes

The course enables students to: – be familiar with the structure of education systems in the developed world; – recognize the goals of knowledge transmission, socialization, and selection typically pursued by education systems; – be knowledgeable about sociological theories dealing with education; – understand selection mechanisms enacted via education systems; – identify the interests of the various stake-holders involved in educational activities; – grasp the key features of the comparative approach to the study of teaching and learning processes; – apply a set of tools for analyzing educational policies (as pertains, for example, to social inequality) and thus interpret them, convey their chief characteristics and assess their outcomes.

Course contents

The course enables students to:

- be familiar with the structure of education systems in the developed world;

- recognize the goals of knowledge transmission, socialization, and selection typically pursued by education systems;

- be knowledgeable about sociological theories dealing with education;

- understand selection mechanisms enacted via education systems;

- identify the interests of the various stake-holders involved in educational activities;

- grasp the key features of the comparative approach to the study of teaching and learning processes;

- apply a set of tools for analyzing educational policies (as pertains, for example, to social inequality) and thus interpret them, convey their chief characteristics and assess their outcomes.

Readings/Bibliography

Regularly attending students (see below) may decide to write an original paper on a topic agreed upon with the professor *and* take a written exam in which they must display familiarity with *one* text chosen (by the student) among the following (all available on-line in pdf format):

- OECD. Education at a Glance 2021: OECD Indicators. Paris: OECD, 2021 (Chapters A, B, C and D);

- OECD. Education Policy Outlook 2019: Working Together to Help Students Achieve Their Potential. Paris: OECD, 2019 (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7, plus 5 countries chosen from those addressed in Chapter 8);

- OECD. Lessons for Education from Covid‑19. A Policy Maker’s Handbook for More Resilient Systems. Paris: OECD, 2020;

- OECD. PISA 2018 Results. Volume II: Where All Students Can Succeed. Paris: OECD, 2019.

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Non-attending students (as well as attending students who prefer not to write a paper) need to take a written exam based on one of the texts listed above for attending students *plus* the following text:

Steven Brint. School and Societies. Stanford Social Sciences, 2nd ed., 2006 *or* 3rd ed., 2017 (Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8).

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If the pandemic emergency endures, the "written" part of the exam will be replaced by an oral exam via MS Teams.

Teaching methods

Face-to-face lectures.

Assessment methods

Starting June 1, 2022, the exam is administered in exclusively *written* form and *in person* (on-line exams are no longer contemplated). The only valid mark is the one achieved in the most recent attempt to pass the exam. Candidates who do not participate in an exam for which they have registered cannot participate in the following exam session. Students can refuse a passing mark just one time.

Students who attend regularly (no more than *3* absences) may decide to deliver a written paper on a topic agreed upon with the professor. In this case, the final mark will be based on an evaluation of the presentation or paper and a final written exam involving the texts mentioned above.

Exam modes may change in light of the ongoing Covid19 public health emergency.

Please note that Art. 25, Paragraph 2 of the Code of Ethics and Conduct of the University of Bologna requires that "in course exams and degree programme final exams, students must refrain from conduct that may cause disturbance or obstacle or involve harmful and/or dishonest consequences towards other students and the institution. Plagiarism or copying of other people's texts or other behaviours that hinder a correct evaluation of exam performances are contrary to the principles of this Code”.

 

Office hours

See the website of Giancarlo Gasperoni