88081 - International Relations

Course Unit Page

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

No poverty Gender equality Peace, justice and strong institutions Partnerships for the goals

Academic Year 2021/2022

Learning outcomes

An introductory course to the analysis of international politics and of foreign policy, 'International relations' provides the students with the basic knowledge and skills to investigate international relations at both the theoretical and empirical levels. At the end of the course, students are expected to be familiar with the current debates in IR theories; to have acquired core skills to intepret key political processes at the international, supranational and transnational levels; to have developed the ability to apply such knowledge towards the understanding of selected outcomes in international politics, also in conjunction with concepts derived from other subjcet matters in their curricula

Course contents

Divided into a Core section (1) and Applied modules (2) 'International Relations' introduces the students to the analysis of international politics and foreign policy. Based on the conceptual lenses of the main approaches in the different IR research traditions, the course focuses on the reciprocal interactions between security dynamics, integration and dis-integration economic processes, normative and institutional evolution in the relations among the different actors on the international scene.

CORE PART: Taught module on core concepts with the help of various visual tools. Duration: 26 hrs divided into 13 classes of 2 hrs each, First part of the Spring Semester.

The CORE SECTION covers the following topics

1. Introduction to the study of IR: Research traditions and evolution of the discipline

2. Classic Realism

3. Neorealism

4. Classic Liberalism

5. Contemporary Liberalism

6. English School

7. Constructivism and post-positivist approaches

8. IPE

9. Global governance

10. Foreign policy analysis

 

APPLIED MODULES: on selected policy applications, offered via small-group workshops organized around flipped classroom modality, with the help of visual tools.

Modules offered in AY 2021-2022, PART II of the Spring Semester:

Modules 1 and 2 Taught by Prof. Baroncelli

Topic 1. The Transformations of Security between empirical reality and theoretical reflection

1.Hirsch Ballin, E., Dijstelbloem, H., & de Goede, P. (2020). The Extension of the Concept of Security. In Security in an Interconnected World (pp. 13-39). Springer, Cham.

2.Donnelly, J. 2016 'The Heterarchic Structure of Twenty-First Century International Governance'. Korean Journal of International Studies 14 (1): 1 – 29.

Topic 2. The ‘Rise and fall of the great powers’: old and new realisms on the ‘China rise’ issue

1. Mearsheimer, J. (2014) Can China Rise Peacefully?, The National Interest, October 25 2014, https://nationalinterest.org/commentary/can-china-rise-peacefully-10204

2 . Schweller, R. Opposite but Compatible Nationalisms: A Neoclassical Realist Approach to the Future of US–China Relations, The Chinese Journal of International Politics, Volume 11, Issue 1, Spring 2018, Pages 23–48, https://doi.org/10.1093/cjip/poy003

3.Visual Contribution: TED Talk by Graham Allison, ‘Thucydides Trap’ (2018), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XewnyUJgyA4

Topic 3. The future of the liberal international order: Realism vs Liberalism

1.Ikenberry, J.G. (2018), ‘The End of the liberal international order?’, in International Affairs 94 (1), 7–23; doi: 10.1093/ia/iix241

2.Mearsheimer, J. (2019) ‘Bound to Fail. The Rise and Fall of the Liberal International Order, International Security, 43 (4), 7-50, https://doi.org/10.1162/ISEC_a_00342

3.Visual contribution: "The Future of the Liberal International Order" with John Ikenberry and John Mearsheimer (2021), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHdE8z_ur6A

Topic 4. IR and the politics of difference: Race and racism

1.Webinar Series "International System of Power" - 19th March 2021

Title: Race and Racism in Understandings of World Order’ – bits by A. Acharya and B.Buzan- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piFnOia0cdw

2.Bhambra, G., Bouka, Y., Persaud, R., Rutazibwa, O., Thakur, V., Bell, D., Smith, K., Haastrup, T. and Adem, S. (2021), ‘Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?’, Foreign Policy, Analysis, JULY 3, 2020.

3.Tazzioli M. ‘The making of racialized subjects: Practices, history, struggles’, Security Dialogue. 2021; 52(1_suppl):107-114. doi:10.1177/09670106211024423

Topic 5. The EU as a global actor in the regime complex for development financing

1. Furness, M,, Luciana-Alexandra Ghica L-A., Lightfoot, S., Szent-Iványi, B. (2020) ‘EU development policy: evolving as an instrument of foreign policy and as an expression of solidarity’, Journal of Contemporary European Research, 16(2), pp. 89-100 DOI https://doi.org/10.30950/jcer.v16i2.1156

2.Baroncelli, B. (2021) ‘Cooperating through competition: EU challenge and support to the World Bank’s focality in development finance’, Global Policy, 2021, 12, pp. 80-89 https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12916

Topic 6. Students present and discuss their papers

 

Module 3 Taught by Dott.ssa Sigillò

Topic 1. The Transformations of Security between empirical reality and theoretical reflection

1.Hirsch Ballin, E., Dijstelbloem, H., & de Goede, P. (2020). The Extension of the Concept of Security. In Security in an Interconnected World (pp. 13-39). Springer, Cham.

2.Donnelly, J. 2016 'The Heterarchic Structure of Twenty-First Century International Governance'. Korean Journal of International Studies 14 (1): 1 – 29.

Topic 2. The ‘Rise and fall of the great powers’: old and new realisms on the ‘China rise’ issue

1. Mearsheimer, J. (2014) Can China Rise Peacefully?, The National Interest, October 25 2014, https://nationalinterest.org/commentary/can-china-rise-peacefully-10204

2 . Schweller, R. Opposite but Compatible Nationalisms: A Neoclassical Realist Approach to the Future of US–China Relations, The Chinese Journal of International Politics, Volume 11, Issue 1, Spring 2018, Pages 23–48, https://doi.org/10.1093/cjip/poy003

3.Visual Contribution: TED Talk by Graham Allison, ‘Thucydides Trap’ (2018), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XewnyUJgyA4

Topic 3. The future of the liberal international order: Realism vs Liberalism

1.Ikenberry, J.G. (2018), ‘The End of the liberal international order?’, in International Affairs 94 (1), 7–23; doi: 10.1093/ia/iix241

2.Mearsheimer, J. (2019) ‘Bound to Fail. The Rise and Fall of the Liberal International Order, International Security, 43 (4), 7-50, https://doi.org/10.1162/ISEC_a_00342

3.Visual contribution: "The Future of the Liberal International Order" with John Ikenberry and John Mearsheimer (2021), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHdE8z_ur6A

Topic 4. IR and the politics of difference: Race and racism

1.Webinar Series "International System of Power" - 19th March 2021

Title: Race and Racism in Understandings of World Order’ – bits by A. Acharya and B.Buzan- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piFnOia0cdw

2.Bhambra, G., Bouka, Y., Persaud, R., Rutazibwa, O., Thakur, V., Bell, D., Smith, K., Haastrup, T. and Adem, S. (2021), ‘Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?’, Foreign Policy, Analysis, JULY 3, 2020.

3.Tazzioli M. ‘The making of racialized subjects: Practices, history, struggles’, Security Dialogue. 2021; 52(1_suppl):107-114. doi:10.1177/09670106211024423

Topic 5. The EU as a global actor in the Mediterranean

1. Del Sarto, R. A. (2016). Normative empire Europe: The European Union, its borderlands, and the ‘Arab spring’. JCMS: journal of common market studies, 54(2), 215-232.

2. Dandashly, A. (2018). EU democracy promotion and the dominance of the security–stability nexus. Mediterranean Politics, 23(1), 62-82.

Topic 6. Students present and discuss their papers

Duration of each module: 12 hrs divided into 6 classes per module, once a week.

Calendar

Group 1. Tuesdays 13-15

NB: Class 1 of Part II will be held on April 20th

Class 1 April 20, Class 2 April, 26, Class 3 May 3, Class 4 May 10, Class 5 May 17, Class 6 May 24.

Group 2.Fridays 15-17

Class 1 April 22, Class 2 April 29, Class 3 May 6, Class 4 May 13, Class 5, May 20, Class 6 May 27

Enrollment in Applied modules is offered via Almaesami lists on a first-come-first served basis, so students are encouraged to enroll as soon as the lists become available (notice provided via Virtuale and by Prof. Baroncelli in class, along with specific guidelines).

**As per the current Unibo and national Covid-related regulations, teaching will be offered in person for all the parts/modules above. Online attendance will be guaranteed (same classes) upon request for those students who cannot attended in person. Please consult this page regularly as updates may be made, depending on changes in Unibo and national Covid-related regulations.

CORE teaching and APPLIED MODULES will be accompanied by GUEST LECTURES by external experts.

Readings/Bibliography

REQUIRED READINGS FOR THE CORE SECTION

-Sorensen, G., Moller, J. and Jackson, R. (2021) Introduction to International Relations, Oxford University Press, 8th Edition, ISBN: 9780198862208

-Baroncelli, E. (2021) ‘Cooperating through competition: EU challenge and support to the World Bank’s focality in development finance’, Global Policy, 12, S1, pp. 80-89, Online ISSN:1758-5899, doi: 10.1111/1758-5899.12916

 


REQUIRED READINGS FOR THE APPLIED MODULES are indicated above in the relevant sections.

Teaching methods

Combination of taught classes (main instructor), flipped classroom modality lessons (main instructor and adjunct instructor) and guest lectures (external experts). More particularly, classes are divided in two modules: First module (core): taught classes, in the first part of the Spring semester; Second module: workshops organized around flipped classroom modality, in the second part of the Spring semester. The flipped classroom structure is adopted specifically to stimulate autonomous content-elaboration and critical reassessment of theories and policies covered during both part 1 and 2 by the students, via team work on targeted topics (academic debates, policy applications) via presentations, debates and discussions in small group modality (where applicable and depending on attendance rates and regulations in place at the start of the Second module). Such work will also rely on targeted readings that will be indicated under the Applied modules section. Classes will be accompanied by Guest lectures and seminars by external experts.

Assessment methods

ATTENDING STUDENTS

Learning by attending students is assessed 1. Via TWO TESTS, ONE ON EACH MODULE (CORE AND CHOSEN APPLIED MODULE), aimed at evaluating their knowledge and ability to autonomously elaborate on the contents covered 2. FINAL ORAL EXAM on the full programme.

To sit the final oral exam attending students must have qualified as attendees (5 out of 6 lessons in flipped classroom modality + active participation to activities therein), AND must have passed THE TWO INTERMEDIATE TESTS WITH AN AVERAGE GRADE EQUAL TO OR HIGHER THAN 18/30. Students who do not meet such standard but want to stay in the attending track are offered the opportunity to re-sit ONE intermediate test (where they have obtained the lowest grade).

Attending students are also offered the opportunity to reject ONE among the two evaluations obtained the intermediate tests.

Make-up test of ONE partial exam is scheduled in the FIRST and SECOND EXAM DATES OFFERED IN JUNE 2022, so attending students are advised to plan ahead of time should they choose/need to avail themselves of such opportunity. Attending students who choose to reject one of the intermediate grades obtained in the written intermediate tests must notify the Tutor, cc-ing the applicable Instructor, about their choice, no later than 1 day after the publication of evaluations of the Second Intermediate Test.

The final grade is a weighted average of FIRST INTERMEDIATE TEST (40%), SECOND INTERMEDIATE TEST (40%), FINAL ORAL EXAM AND CLASS PARTICIPATION (20%).

NON ATTENDING STUDENTS

One written exam (10 questions, short open answer, 0-3 pts max each) and one final oral exam on the full course program (Core Part and Part Two – without classwork but with readings indicated therein). In addition, non-attending students will prepare ONE of the following monographs:

a) K. Waltz, Man, the State and War, Columbia University Press (1959)

b) K. Waltz, Theory of International Politics, Addison Wesley (1979)

c) R. Gilpin, War and Change in International Politics, Cambridge University Press (1981)

d) S. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order, Simon & Schuster (1997)

e) A. Wendt, Social Theory of International Politics, Cambridge University Press (1999)

f) A. Hirschman, National Power and the Structure of Foreign Trade, University of California Press (1945)

g) E. Baroncelli, The European Union, the World Bank and the Policymaking of Aid: Cooperation among Developers, Routledge (2019)

h) V. E. Parsi The Wrecking of the Liberal World Order. Palgrave-Macmillan (2021).

Non Attending students are kindly requested to enroll in two separate lists (1.written test non-attending students 2.oral exam) via the AlmaEsami Platform, following the procedures and regulations applicable for such System. In order to qualify for a valid passing grade, non-attending students will have to show that they have sufficient knowledge of and control on written and oral exposition of main IR research traditions, theories and substantive issues as covered in the Course Syllabus.

Teaching tools

Ppt, visual and interactive web and non-web based tools, guest lectures by external experts and seminars, inclusive teaching to enhance class participation.

Office hours

See the website of Eugenia Baroncelli

See the website of Ester Sigillò

See the website of