00996 - Greek History

Course Unit Page

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Quality education Peace, justice and strong institutions

Academic Year 2021/2022

Learning outcomes

At the end of the course, students know the general development of Greek history, have a knowledge of the different sources used for the historical reconstruction and get the main informations on events, historical phenomena and modern historiography on the topics dealt at classes. Students become familiar with the Greek chronology and read ancient authors in translation, either Italian or in other modern language. They become also used to the technical terminology of the discipline.

Course contents

  1. Sources, methods and tools for the study of Greek history (approximately 12 hours).
  2. Events, themes and prominent figures of Greek history through the analysis of selected and translated sources pertaining to the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods (approximately 24 hours).
  3. Greek Historiography (approximately 12 hours)
  4. Specific topic: interactions between history and philosophy in Greek thought (approximately 12 hours).

The program also includes an illustration of the institutional, political, socio-cultural contexts of the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic period.

Readings/Bibliography

Students are required to study:

  1. M. Bettalli (a cura di), Storia greca, Carocci, Roma 2021
  2. D. Musti, Storia greca. Linee di sviluppo dall'età micenea all'età romana, Laterza, Roma-Bari 1990 (second edition and following reprints): only the parts indicated by the teacher at the beginning of the course; M. Giangiulio (ed.), Introduzione alla storia greca, Il Mulino, Bologna 2021: only the parts indicated by the teacher at the beginning of the course; F. Muccioli, Storia dell'Ellenismo, Il Mulino, Bologna 2019:only the parts indicated by the teacher at the beginning of the course
  3. M. Bettalli (ed.), Introduzione alla storiografia greca, Carocci, Roma 2009 (second edition and following reprints).
  4. A book chosen among the followings:
    • P. Carlier, Omero e la storia, Italian edition by S. De Vido and L. Mondin, Carocci, Roma 2014;
    • D. Musti, Demokratìa. Origini di un’idea, Laterza, Roma-Bari 1995 (and following reprints);
    • F. Muccioli, Le orecchie lunghe di Alessandro Magno. Satira del potere nel mondo greco (IV-I secolo a.C.), Carocci, Roma 2018.
  5. Selected and translated sources supplied during lectures (cf. virtuale.unibo.it). The sources will be presented in the original language but always accompanied by a translation into Italian.

Students who will not attend lessons are required to study:

  1. D. Musti, Storia greca. Linee di sviluppo dall'età micenea all'età romana, Laterza, Roma-Bari 1990 (second edition and following reprints): full reading; or M. Giangiulio (ed.), Introduzione alla storia greca, Il Mulino, Bologna 2021: full reading, AND F. Muccioli, Storia dell'Ellenismo, Il Mulino, Bologna 2019: full reading.
  2. M. Bettalli (ed.), Introduzione alla storiografia greca, Carocci, Roma 2009 (second edition and following reprints): full reading.
  3. Two books chosen among the followings:
    • P. Carlier, Omero e la storia, Carocci, Roma 2014;
    • D. Musti, Demokratìa. Origini di un’idea, Laterza, Roma-Bari 1995 (e successive ristampe);
    • F. Muccioli, Le orecchie lunghe di Alessandro Magno. Satira del potere nel mondo greco (IV-I secolo a.C.), Carocci, Roma 2018.
  4. The following sources (Aristotle and a Life by Plutarch):
  • Aristotele, Politica. Libri V e VI, ed. by M.E. De Luna - C. Zizza - M. Curnis, Roma 2015;
  • a Life by Plutarch choosing among Solone, Temistocle, Cimone, Lisandro, Alessandro, Demetrio, Arato, Filopemene (Mondadori-Valla or BUR).

Bibliographic resources are available at the DiSCi Library of Ancient History (Bologna, via Zamboni 38).

Teaching methods

The course consists mainly in lectures. Students will take part in lessons and practice studying ancient sources and solving related problems.

Assessment methods

Oral examination (in a single exam session) will test the knowledge of the course contents (individual study texts and sources). It will take place in two steps:

  1. at least 3 questions concerning the events of the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods;
  2. at least 2 questions concerning Greek historiography, selected book and sources analysed during the course; for non-attending students, at least 2 questions concerning Greek historiography, selected book, sources for non-attending students and full version sources.

If the student achieves a complete and detailed vision of the topics discussed in class and required for the discipline, provides an effective critical commentary, shows mastery of expression and of the specific language, he obtains excellence in the evaluation (28-30L).

Those students who demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the main topics of the subject, basic analytical ability and ability to synthesize, and a correct command of the language, will be given a good mark (25-27).

Those students who demonstrate a mnemonic (and/or non-exhaustive) knowledge of the subject with a more superficial analytical ability and ability to synthesize, a correct command of the language but not always appropriate, will be given a satisfactory mark (22-24).

A superficial knowledge and understanding of the material, a scarce analytical and expressive ability that is not always appropriate will be rewarded with a ‘pass’ mark (18-21).

A student will be deemed to have failed the exam if he displays significant errors in his understanding and failure to grasp the overall outlines of the subject, together with a poor command of the appropriate terminology (< 18).



Teaching tools

Original sources will be displayed during lectures.

Sources to be read will be supplied online during the course (virtuale.unibo.it).

Office hours

See the website of Maria Elena De Luna