84929 - Game and Software Localization (CL1)

Course Unit Page

Academic Year 2020/2021

Course contents

The Software Localization module introduces the concept of localization in software, explaining its specific characteristics and potential pitfalls in relation to other forms of translation, in the context of modern technological translation practices. Subsequently, the various texts that need to be translated in software (dialogues, interfaces, tutorials, etc.) will be presented and the way in which they are dealt with will be clarified. To this end, issues such as transcreation, management of variables/placeholders, limitations in terms of size and vision, bugs prevention and the conventions of software localization (often not present in other kind of materials) will be reviewed.

(these course contents have been post-edited from a machine-translated version, produced in-house at DIT)

Readings/Bibliography

  • Esselink B., A Practical Guide to Localization, John Benjamins Publishing Co., 2000, ISBN 9027219567
  • GNU gettext tools [https://www.gnu.org/software/gettext/manual/gettext.pdf] , version 0.19.8.1.515- e50fa. Native Language Support Library and Tools Edition 0.19.8.1.515-e50fa, 28 April 2019
  • AA. VV., Italian Style Guide [https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/language/StyleGuides] , Redmond, Microsoft Corporation, Feb 2019
  • Android localization guide [https://developer.android.com/guide/topics/resources/localization]

Teaching methods

COVID-allowing, interactive lessons will be offered, with a combination theoretical concepts as well as practical examples to illustrate the concepts, coming from real projects. Practical exercises will also be proposed in which students will translate texts from real projects in order to acquire skills useful to enter in this sector.

(these course contents have been post-edited from a machine-translated version, produced in-house at DIT)

Assessment methods

The final written exam consists of a number of theoretical and practical questions about the contents of the course.

Game and Software localization belongs to the Translation and Media Accessibility module (together with Audiovisual Translation). The grade obtained in Software Localization will count 50%, with the other 50% coming from the Game Localization module. The two grades obtained in the two tests will in turn be averaged by 50% with the Audiovisual Translation component for the final grade of the Translation and Media Accessibility integrated module.

Grading Scale

  • 30-30L: Excellent level. The student possesses excellent localization skills, with a very high level of competence in the different formats. (S)he pays attention to the detail, including formatting, length, clarity, and usability.
  • 27-29: Above average level. The student makes only minor errors, and shows a solid command of the required technical skills and competences. (S)he shows a good compromise in aspects of formatting, length, clarity, and usability.
  • 24–26: Generally sound level. The student shows a number of shortcomings, indicating a reasonable command of the required skills and competences. (S)he takes care of at least one or two of the formatting, length, clarity, and usability aspects.
  • 21-23: Adequate level. The student shows significant shortcomings and only an adequate command of the required skills and competences. (S)he neglects the formatting, length, clarity, and usability aspects.
  • 18–20: Low level. The student only meets the minimum level required and shows a minimal command of the required skills and competences.
  • < 18 Fail: The candidate does not meet the required standard and shows a wholly inadequate command of the required skills and competences.

Office hours

See the website of Luis Alberto Barron Cedeno

See the website of Marco Locatelli