82007 - International Economics Policy (Gr. A)

Course Unit Page

Academic Year 2018/2019

Course contents

The course is composed of two parts. The first part examines the principal theories of international political economy (realist, mercantilist, Marxist, liberal, and constructivist). In addition, the course will also examine theoretical approaches that emphasize how national policies affect international governance, and viceversa. The second part analyses the main international organisations in trade, finance, and monetary governance. We will discuss their origins, functions, history, and recent events.

Readings/Bibliography

Students attending class:

Alacevich, M. and Soci, A. (2018), Inequality. A Short History, Washington, DC: Brookings University Press

Ravenhill, J. (2017), Global Political Economy, Oxford University Press

Additional readings (see the syllabus online)

Students non attending class:

Alacevich, M. and Soci, A. (2018), Inequality. A Short History, Washington, DC: Brookings University Press

Baldwin, Richard (2016), The Great Convergence, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press

Ravenhill, J. (2017), Global Political Economy, Oxford University Press

The following papers:

Robert W. Cox, “Multilateralism and World Order”, Review of International Studies, Vol. 18, No. 2 (Apr., 1992), pp. 161-180

Peter J. Katzenstein, Robert O. Keohane and Stephen D. Krasner, “International Organization and the Study of World Politics”, International Organization, Vol. 52, No. 4 (Autumn, 1998), pp. 645-685

Lisa L. Martin and Beth A. Simmons, “Theories and Empirical Studies of International Institutions”, International Organization, Vol. 52, No. 4 (Autumn, 1998), pp. 729-757

Dani Rodrik, “What Do Trade Agreements Really Do?”, The Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol. 32, No. 2 (Spring 2018), pp. 73-90

Shaun Narine, “US Domestic Politics and America’s Withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership: Implications for Southeast Asia”, Contemporary Southeast Asia, Vol. 40, No. 1 (April 2018), pp. 50-76

John Gerard Ruggie, “International Regimes, Transactions, and Change: Embedded Liberalism in the Postwar Economic Order”, International Organization, Vol. 36, No. 2, International Regimes (Spring, 1982), pp. 379-415

Susan Strange, “The Persistent Myth of Lost Hegemony”, International Organization, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Autumn, 1987), pp. 551-574

Michele Alacevich, “The World Bank and the politics of productivity: the debate on economic growth, poverty, and living standards in the 1950s”, Journal of Global History, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 53-74

Michele Alacevich, “Planning Peace: The European Roots of the Post-War Global Development Challenge”, Past & Present, Volume 239, Issue 1, 1 May 2018, Pages 219–264

Will Steffen, Jacques Grinevald, Paul Crutzen and John McNeill, “The Anthropocene: conceptual and historical perspectives”, Philosophical Transactions: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Vol. 369, No. 1938, The Anthropocene: a new epoch of geological time? (13 March 2011), pp. 842-867

Will Steffen, Paul J. Crutzen and John R. McNeill, “The Anthropocene: Are Humans Now Overwhelming the Great Forces of Nature?”, Ambio, Vol. 36, No. 8 (Dec., 2007), pp. 614-621

Eric Helleiner, “Understanding the 2007–2008 Global Financial Crisis: Lessons for Scholars of International Political Economy”, Annual Review of Political Science, Vol. 14, 2011, pp. 67-87

Eric Helleiner, “A Bretton Woods moment? The 2007-2008 crisis and the future of global finance”, International Affairs, Vol. 86, No. 3 (May 2010), pp. 619-636

Teaching methods

Frontal lectures and class discussion

Assessment methods

Students attending class:

- Mid-term exam

- Term paper (max. 3,000 words)

 

Students non attending class:

Oral examination

Office hours

See the website of Michele Alacevich