96876 - NORTH-SOUTH RELATIONS IN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

Course Unit Page

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Peace, justice and strong institutions Partnerships for the goals

Academic Year 2021/2022

Learning outcomes

The course aims at providing students with the skills and tools to understand the historical evolution of relations between the countries of the North and the countries of the South during the XIX and the XX centuries. At the end of the course students know the processes of colonization and decolonization, the interaction between the nation-building processes pursued by the governments of the countries of the South after independence and the Cold War, the role played by the countries of the South within international organizations such as the United Nations, and their contemporary efforts aimed at promoting regional integration and reshaping international power relations.

Course contents

The course analyses the evolution of North-South relations in historical perspective, from colonialism to the end of the Cold War. More specifically, the course analyses the colonisation of Asia and Africa by the European powers, the imposition of different models of colonial rule and their long-term political, economic and social impact on the countries of Asia and Africa, the process of decolonisation, the economic development strategies pursued by the countries of the South after the Second World War, the relations between the North and the South during the Cold War, the military interventions in the South after the end of the Cold War (in particular in Iraq and Afghanistan), and the recent South-South cooperation efforts.

Readings/Bibliography

Readings for attending students

N. Tarling, The Establishment of the Colonial Régimes, in Cambridge History of Southeast Asia, vol. 3, From c. 1800 to the 1930s, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1999; D. Washbrook, The Political Economy of Colonialism in India, in H. Fischer-Tiné, M. Framke (eds), Routledge Handbook of the History of Colonialism in South Asia, Abington, Routledge, 2022; M. Mann, State Formation in India: From the Company State to the Late Colonial State, in H. Fischer-Tiné, M. Framke (eds), Routledge Handbook of the History of Colonialism in South Asia, Abington, Routledge, 2022; G. N. Uzoigwe, European Partition and Conquest of Africa: An Overview, in General History of Africa, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1985; R. F. Betts, Methods and Institutions of European Domination, in General History of Africa, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1985.

or in alternative:

C. Aydin, Regions and Empires in the Political History of the Long Nineteenth Century, in J. Osterhammel and S. Conrad (eds), A Emerging Modern World, 1750-1870, Harvard University Press, 2018, pp: 33-277.

2) J. Jansen, J. Osterhammel, Decolonization, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2017.

3) O. A. Westad, The Global Cold War. Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2005.

 

Readings for non attending students

C. Aydin, Regions and Empires in the Political History of the Long Nineteenth Century, in J. Osterhammel and S. Conrad (eds), A Emerging Modern World, 1750-1870, Harvard University Press, 2018, pp: 33-277.

V. Prashad, The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South, London, Verso, 2014.

O. A. Westad, The Global Cold War. Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2005.

J. Dinkel, The Non-Aligned Movement: Genesis, Organisation and Politics (1927-1992), Leiden, Brill, 2019.

Teaching methods

The course is composed by two different sections. The first one consists of 16 lectures, for a total of 32 hours, and the second will be organized in the form of seminars. For the second part, students will be divided in two separate groups.

Assessment methods

Students attending classes:

Two written exams (3 questions, 1 hour) during the course and a final written exam (on all the topics of the course). The final mark is the average of the marks of the three exams.

Students not attending classes:

Oral exam

Teaching tools

Power point

Office hours

See the website of Arrigo Pallotti

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