75461 - Structural Strengthening and Rehabilitation M

Course Unit Page

Academic Year 2021/2022

Learning outcomes

At the end of the class, student has knowledge of of available techniques and their application for strengthening or upgrading existing structural systems, with special emphasis on historical structures. In particular, at the end of the course he/she is able to assess materials and structural deficiency using field test or analytical methods, as well as to identify the suitable materials and techniques to strengthening and upgrading of gravity load-designed buildings for earthquake load resistance.

Course contents

  1. HISTORIC MASONRY STRUCTURES, QUALITY AND TESTING (8 Hrs)

    Quality of masonry, testing methods at component and assembly level for strength estimate. Capacity models, from laboratory tests to masonry wall strength.

    Case study n. 1 – Testing on a old storehouse in Trieste.

  2. DAMAGE STATES IN MASONRY BUILDINGS AFTER EARTHQUAKES AND SAFETY ASSESSMENT METHODS OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS (12 Hrs)

    Behaviour of historic masonry buildings during earthquakes. Definition of the possible state of damage and identification of the causes. How to acquire knowledge of the building state and its structural performances.

    Level of analysis for seismic safety assessment: simplified methods for assessing global performances of the building (Resisto method and LV1 method), local collapse mechanisms, full non linear analysis.

    Examples of application of the different level of analysis.

    Case study n. 2: Damage scenarios after Aquila (2009), Emilia (2012) and Centro Italia (2016) earthquakes.

    Case study n. 3: Vulnerability assessment of historic monumental buildings: Venafro Castle in Molise

  3. CRITERIA AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR REHABILITATION OF HISTORIC MASONRY BUILDINGS (12 Hrs)

    Main goals to be achieved in masonry building strengthening. The box behaviours of a masonry building. Use of steel ties.

    Masonry walls - Rehabilitation techniques for historic masonry structures. Traditional technologies for repairing masonry cracks (injections, reinforced injections, hoops, etc.) – Techniques for large stone buildings and walls

    Curved masonry elements (vaults, arches, etc) - Traditional and innovative consolidation techniques for masonry vaults and domes.

    Vulnerability assessment and Consolidation of slender towers.

    Use of innovative materials - Use of composite materials (FRP, FRCM) for strengthening of masonry walls and curved structures: properties of composite materials, strengthening criteria and rules for intervention design.

    Wood structures in historic buildings – classical timber structures for roofs and floors. Criteria for rehabilitation of timber structures. Advanced use of timber structures: use of wooden floor diaphragms for seismic strengthening of masonry buildings

    Foundation structures – Foundation typologies in historic masonry buildings - Consolidation techniques of foundations (rehabilitation with micro piles, soil consolidation, use of consolidating injections).

    Case study n. 4: Design of rehabilitation interventions on historic buildings: masonry buildings in Parma, Corinaldo (AN)

    Case study n. 5: Use of wooden roof diaphragms for seismic rehabilitation of a historic barn in Mantova

  4. OVERVIEW OF PRESERVATION PROBLEMS IN CONTEMPORARY HISTORIC REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDINGS (4 Hrs)

How to acquire knowledge of the building state and its structural performances: a sound understanding of the structure’s history (original construction techniques, previous repair works, etc.), heritage significance, and physical condition, as well as current and potential risks.

Assessing the susceptibility of the structure to potential deterioration.

Some concepts about possible intervention approaches for historic concrete structures: maintenance, repair, or replacement.

Behaviour of historic reinforced concrete buildings: effects of the deterioration state on the structural response. Need to predict, or at least understand, ongoing deterioration and the effect of any repair process, which are critical to the development of conservation proposals.

  1. HOMEWORK (12 Hrs)

Seismic vulnerability assessment of a simple masonry building; definition of the rehabilitation strategies and of most important interventions.

Teaching methods

Frontal classes and an homework

Assessment methods

oral exam

Office hours

See the website of Marco Savoia

See the website of Michele Palermo