23709 - Innovation Management

Course Unit Page

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Decent work and economic growth Sustainable cities

Academic Year 2020/2021

Learning outcomes

The course provides students with an understanding of contemporary issues in innovation and technology management. We highlight the critical role of innovation and technology in today's economy. Upon completion of the subject, students should be able to:

- describe innovation types, innovation management and the impact of innovation on companies' goals, strategies, and behaviors.
- explain in rich details the impact of innovation in today's global economy;
- evaluate the roles of tangible, intangible, and human resources in innovation.
- describe the functioning of innovative processes in firms of different size and operating in different industry contexts.
- identify the potential of ICT technology and explore the impact of Internet over a firm's strategy.

Course contents

The first part of the course will deepen the dynamics of technology innovation. The second part will cover the technology innovation strategy. The third part of the course will focus on the implementation of technology innovation strategy. Key arguments are:

  • The sources of innovation
  • Innovation types and models
  • In search of the right time for market entries
  • Mechanisms to protect innovation
  • Organizing innovation processes
  • Managing new product development teams
  • Managing new product development processes
  • Innovation strategies for small and medium-sized firms

    Readings/Bibliography

    Required readings consist of cases and articles included in "Gestione dell'innovazione", published by McGraw-Hill (ref. 'Create' 9781307079180). Course materials can be purchased from two selected bookshops: Libreria Bookstop, via Marsala 27/B Bologna (tel 051-2960662); LEUP-Libreria Patron, Piazza Verdi 4, Bologna (tel 051-223208).

    Teaching methods

    This is an applied, case-based course. Conceptual understanding is developed through:

    · Lectures by instructor .

    · Readings on the theory and practice of the management of innovation. Readings are designed to provide a starting point for analyzing the case, but extension of the ideas is encouraged, as they will be applied in an integrative fashion in the discussions.

    · Case studies of prominent strategies. Given the nature of the course, we will also apply the lessons from the cases to understand the challenges and implications of innovation in a setting that approximates the management teams typically charged with such tasks.

    · Team case analysis intended to give you the opportunity to apply your learning from this course to relevant and interesting contexts.

    · Guest lecturers by expert practitioners to help students familiarize with the many challenges of managing innovation for a variety of organizations.

    Assessment methods

    Students can decide not to attend the course. Course materials are the same, both for attending and not attending students. To be considered in attendance, a student must be present in the class for at least 80% of the total number of lessons.

    Students not attending lectures cannot ask for a thesis in this subject.

    Final test. Not attending students will be evaluated with a written test combining multiple choice and open questions (maximum score: 30). Oral exams are not possible.

    Attending students will be evaluated with a written test (with a reduced number of questions) combining multiple choice and open questions (maximum score: 26), and two teamwork activities (rewarded with a maximum of 4). Oral exams are not possible.

    Team case analysis. Attending students will be requested to distribute in groups of six-seven. The list of group members is due at the end of the first lesson. The team is expected to (criteria for grading): a.- analyze the case, identify key problems/strategic issues, and logically apply the course material to the phenomenon under investigation; b.- provide a thorough and rigorous quantitative and/or qualitative analysis of the phenomenon; c.- draw implications and suggest realistic, workable, well-supported recommendations for high-level executives; d.- outline an implementation plan and discuss which insights are generalizable and under what conditions.

    The outcome of the team analysis is a report (Word document) and a Powerpoint presentation. The project report should have no more than 2,500 words (tables and graphs do not contribute to the word count). Students can decide the format and the structure of the report. The PPT presentation should convey the key messages to an audience of high-level businessmen and potential investors (approximately 15 slides). Detailed guidelines for project works will be delivered during the very first session.

    Class participation and discussion. Informed and engaged participation is an essential part of this course and is expected from everyone. Students will be required to participate in lively class discussions that will be personally challenging. Students are expected to prepare the assigned cases and readings prior to each class . Discussion questions for the case will be set prior to each session, to enable you to focus your attention. Some of the cases are subjected to a number of interpretations. Thus, meeting with a study group will therefore be an integral part of your learning. Evaluation of class participation will emphasize the mastery of concepts and critical thinking skills of application, synthesis, and evaluation. Active engagement means that student is listening carefully to the comments of his peers and seeking opportunities to make comments that move the class discussion forward.

    Teaching tools

    The teacher will provide students with further readings and insights on critical topics related to the management of innovation and technology.

    Office hours

    See the website of Andrea Lipparini