05515 - History of International Relations

Course Unit Page

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

No poverty Quality education Decent work and economic growth Reduced inequalities

Academic Year 2018/2019

Learning outcomes

At the end of the course students will develop a basic knowledge of the main political and economic processes which have left their mark on international history since late 19th century to present. Besides, students will become familiar with the most significant debates on theory and methods which have characterized the international literature. Therefore they will be able to provide in-depth explanations for the meaning of events which most characterize the relations among states and other actors in the global arena.

Course contents

The course is divided into two parts:

I. Elements of history of international relations between the two world wars (1914-1945). From the opposition between the Wilsonian project and Leninism; from the end of anti-nazi coalition to the rise of US-USSR conflict.

II. History of international relations after WWII throught the prism of Cold War (1947-1991). Periodizations and conceptualizations of the Cold War. Dynamics of the rise of the conflict in Europe and its extension to other geopolitical areas. Bipolar confrontations and international economic relations. Intersections between the East-West confrontation and the new conflicts which characterized the North-South axis (decolonization and claims from the "South of the World"). Cold War between ideology and Realpolitik.

Readings/Bibliography

 
Textbooks:   
- G. Arrighi, "Caos e governo del mondo", Bruno Mondadori. 

-K. Polanyi, "La grande trasformazione", Einaudi.

-H. Arendt, 'Parte Seconda. L'imperialismo', in "Origini del totalitarismo", Einaudi.

 

Teaching methods

The course will be organized on a lecture-class basis, documentary films and other sources when necessary. Further modalities of interaction and participation will be communicated during the course.

Assessment methods

The exam is written. Four open questions will be posed in order to appraise students' capacity of assimilation and synthesis of the contents both of classes and textbooks.

Students' ability to answer in synthetic and coherent form, as well as their ability in comparing problems and situations distant in time and space if required, will be rewarded with top marks. At the same time, the use of proper language and concepts from the discipline of history of international relations, which students will assimilate during the course, will be highly valued.

A superficial and scholastic exposition, as well as the inability to identify the focus of the questions, will preclude to the student the prospect of obtaining a high mark. A lacking knowledge of the textbook will bring to a insufficient evaluation of the exam.

Teaching tools

The course will be organized on a lecture-class basis, documentary films and other sources when necessary. Further modalities of interaction and participation will be communicated during the course.

Office hours

See the website of Roberto Peruzzi