72564 - Institutions of Philosophy (1)

Course Unit Page

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Quality education

Academic Year 2021/2022

Learning outcomes

The course introduces the vocabulary, the methodology and the main thematic areas of discipline and trains to the reading and critical analysis of philosophical texts. At the end of the course the student has become familiar with the vocabulary and the main tools of research in the fields of history of philosophy; He also has the basic conceptual and methodological tools to understand a philosophical text, grasp its meaning in a historical perspective, orientate in problematic issues and in the most important historiographical interpretations of the discipline.

Course contents

Time and things. The problem of duration between late antiquity and Middle Ages

Time is one of the most intricate and thorny problems of the Western philosophical philosophy. There is no condition more immediately evident in our experience, but difficult to define in its existence and nature. The medieval thinkers are fascinated by this problem: its definition, its link with motion, the concept of duration, the relationship with eternity are all different perspectives, from which humans explore the inexorable becoming of substances, investigating what escapes (or seems to escape) mutability.

Examining the texts, exploring the sources and considering the formulation of different notions of time and duration do not mean facing only a specific philosophical problem, but rather exploring worldviews.

Readings/Bibliography

Bibliography

Primary sources:

[1] Introduction

  • C. Esposito, P. Porro, Filosofia antica e medievale, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2008, pp. 200-401.

o in alternativa:

  • M. Vegetti, L. Fonnesu, Le ragioni della filosofia. 1 -Filosofia antica e medievale, Le Monnier Scuola, Milano 2008, pp. 475-679.

(For other textbooks please contact the teacher)

 

[2] The concepts of duration between 4th and 8th century with special attention to the relationship eternity-time

  • Sant’Agostino, Confessioni, vol. IV, libri X-XI, a cura di M. Cristiani, tr. it. di G. Chiarini, Fondazione Lorenzo Valla / Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, Milano 1996, pp. 105-160 [libro XI]
  • Severino Boezio, La consolazione della filosofia, V, prose 3, 4 e 6 (passim), tr. it. di O. Dallera, BUR, Milano 2010, pp. 349-357, 361-367, 377-389.

[3] The diffusion of Aristotle's physics in the Latin world: the combination “time-motion” in the 13th-century theological discussions

  • Alberto Magno, Somma sulle creature (De IV coeaequaevis), tr. 2, q. 5, art. 2: Che cosa è il tempo? (sarà fornita una traduzione italiana).
  • Tommaso d’Aquino, Commento alle Sentenze, I, dist. 19, q. 2, art. 1: Se l’eternità sia la sostanza di Dio (sarà fornita una traduzione italiana).

 

Optional secondary literature for attending students: 

  • G. Catapano, Introduzione, in: Sant’Agostino, Il tempo, Città Nuova, Roma 2007, pp. 5-29.
  • G. d’Onofrio, Boezio e l’essenza del tempo, in: L. Ruggiu (a cura di), Il tempo in questione. Paradigmi della temporalità nel pensiero occidentale, Guerini, Milano 1996, pp. 119-129.
  • P. Porro, Un tempo per le cose. Il problema della durata dell’essere sostanziale nella ricezione scolastica di Aristotele, in: L. Ruggiu (a cura di), Il tempo in questione. Paradigmi della temporalità nel pensiero occidentale, Guerini, Milano 1996, pp. 142-154
  • P. Porro, Il vocabolario filosofico medievale del tempo e della durata, in R. Capasso - P. Piccari (a cura di), Il tempo nel Medioevo. Rappresentazioni storiche e concezioni filosofiche, Società Italiana di Demodossalogia, Roma 2000, pp. 63-102.
  • R. Blasberg, «Duplex Tempus». Il duplice concetto di tempo in Alberto Magno, in G. Alliney – L. Cova (a cura di), La concettualizzazione del tempo nel pensiero tardomedievale, Olschki, Firenze 2000, pp. 241-251.
  • A. Ghisalberti, La nozione di tempo in S. Tommaso d’Aquino, in: Rivista di Filosofia Neoscolastica, 59 (1967), pp. 343-371.

Obligatory and optional secondary literature for not attending students:

(In addition to the primary sources not attending students have to study at least two of the following texts)

 

  • G. Catapano, Introduzione, in: Sant’Agostino, Il tempo, Città Nuova, Roma 2007, pp. 5-29.
  • G. d’Onofrio, Boezio e l’essenza del tempo, in: L. Ruggiu (a cura di), Il tempo in questione. Paradigmi della temporalità nel pensiero occidentale, Guerini, Milano 1996, pp. 119-129.
  • P. Porro, Un tempo per le cose. Il problema della durata dell’essere sostanziale nella ricezione scolastica di Aristotele, in: L. Ruggiu (a cura di), Il tempo in questione. Paradigmi della temporalità nel pensiero occidentale, Guerini, Milano 1996, pp. 142-154
  • P. Porro, Il vocabolario filosofico medievale del tempo e della durata, in R. Capasso - P. Piccari (a cura di), Il tempo nel Medioevo. Rappresentazioni storiche e concezioni filosofiche, Società Italiana di Demodossalogia, Roma 2000, pp. 63-102.
  • R. Blasberg, «Duplex Tempus». Il duplice concetto di tempo in Alberto Magno, in G. Alliney – L. Cova (a cura di), La concettualizzazione del tempo nel pensiero tardomedievale, Olschki, Firenze 2000, pp. 241-251.
  • A. Ghisalberti, La nozione di tempo in S. Tommaso d’Aquino, in: Rivista di Filosofia Neoscolastica, 59 (1967), pp. 343-371.
 

 

Teaching methods

Frontal lectures, reading, commentary and discussion of the texts.

Some text of bibliography will be available on Virtuale.

Assessment methods

30 cum laude - Excellent as to knowledge, philosophical lexicon and critical expression.

30 – Excellent: knowledge is complete, well argued and correctly expressed, with some slight faults.

27-29 – Good: thorough and satisfactory knowledge; essentially correct expression.

24-26 - Fairly good: knowledge broadly acquired, and not always correctely expressed.

21-23 – Sufficient: superficial and partial knowledge; exposure and articulation are incomplete and often not sufficiently appropriate

18-21 - Almost sufficient: superficial and decontextualized knowledge. The exposure of the contents shows important gaps.

Exam failed - Students are requested to show up at a subsequent exam session if basic skills and knowledge are not sufficiently acquired and not placed in the historical-philosophical context.

Teaching tools

A web page with texts of bibliography and eventual slides shown during the lessons will be available on Virtuale.

Office hours

See the website of Andrea Colli