68341 - COMPARATIVE POLITICAL ECONOMY

Course Unit Page

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

No poverty Decent work and economic growth Reduced inequalities

Academic Year 2019/2020

Learning outcomes

L'insegnamento mira a fornire gli strumenti teorici ed empirici di base per l’analisi comparativa dei principali modelli di political economy dei paesi capitalisti. Alla fine del corso lo studente sarà in grado di: • analizzare le somiglianze e le differenze che intercorrono tra diversi modelli di paesi capitalisti • porre ‘Research Questions' concernenti gli strumenti volti a comprendere i meccanismi di political economy

Course contents

Course design and objectives

The course is designed to explore the frontiers of interaction between politics and economics by engaging comparative research on varieties of political economies. It focuses on approaches that conceptualise different models of capitalism and investigates the role of political actors, institutions and interest groups in shaping and transforming these models.

The course is structured around two key questions: To what extent do differences in institutional settings shape fundamentally different models of democratic capitalism? What is the role of institutions, firms and labour unions in determining the different arrangements we find in capitalist countries?

Learning outcomes

At the end of the course students will be able to:

  • Analyse and compare national political economies
  • Critically evaluate political economic outcomes
  • Understand the institutional foundations of comparative advantage

Course procedure and evaluation

Students are encouraged to actively participate during the classes. They are required to prepare short group presentations and to hand in one question per week to stimulate discussions.

Participation in class will count for 25% of the grade

Written paper will count for 75% of the grade (3000 words). Deadline for paper : 4 January 2020.

  1. Introduction

    Hall, Peter A. 1997. The Role of Interests, Institutions and Ideas in the Political Economy of Industrialized Nations” In Lichbach, Mark I. and Zuckerman, Alan S. eds., Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure. Cambridge, New York etc.: Cambridge University Press, pp. 174-207.

    Further reading

    Clift, B. 2014 Comparative Political Economy. States, Markets and Global Capitalism, Palgrave MacMillan.

    Georg Menz, Comparative Political Economy, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2017

  2. The classical debate

Gerschenkron, Alexander. 1962. Economic Backwardness in Historical Perspective: A Book of Essays. Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, pp. 5-30.

Katzenstein, Peter J. 1985. Small States in World Markets: Industrial Policy in Europe. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press; chapter 1 and parts of chapter 3, pp. 17-38, 80-104.

3. Globalisation and comparative political economy

Mann, M. 1997, Has globalization ended the rise and rise of the nation-state? Review of International Political Economy, 4.

Rommel, T. and Walter, S. 2018. The Electoral Consequences of Offshoring: How the Globalization of Production Shapes Party Preferences, Comparative Political Studies, 51, 5, pp.621-658.

Hay, C. 2011. Globalisation’s impact on states, I.J. Ravenhill ed. Global political economy, Oxford, Oxford University Press, pp. 312-44.

4. Comparing countries

Sartori, G. 1994. Compare Why and How. Comparing, miscomparing and the comparative method, in Dogan, M. K and Kazancigil, A. (eds.) Comparing nations: concepts, strategies and substance, Oxford, Basil Blackwell.

5. Varieties of Capitalism:

Hall, P. and Soskice, D. 2001. An Introduction to Varieties of Capitalism, in P. Hall and D. Soskice, eds. Varieties of Capitalism. Oxford University Press, pp. 1-68.

6. Comparative labour markets

Fleckenstein, T. and Lee, S. 2017. The Politics of Labor Market Reform in Coordinated Welfare Capitalism: Comparing Sweden, Germany, and South Korea. World Politics,

Bearce, D., and Hart, A. 2017. International Labor Mobility and the Variety of Democratic Political Institutions. International Organization, 71, pp. 65-95.

Lallement, M. 2011. Europe and the economic crisis: forms of labour market adjustment and varieties of capitalism, Work, employment and society, 25, pp. 627-641.

Zartaloudis, S. and A. Kornelakis. 2017. Flexicurity between Europeanization and Varieties of Capitalism? A Comparative Analysis of Employment Protection Reforms in Portugal and Greece. Journal of Common Market Studies, 55, pp.1144-1161.

7. Comparing inequality trends

Anthony B. Atkinson. 2015. Inequality. What Can Be Done? Harvard University Press: 263-280.

François Bourguignon. 2015. The Globalization of Inequality, Princeton University Press, pp. 75-116.

Iversen, T. and D. Soskice. 2006. Electoral Institutions and the Politics of Coalitions: Why Some Democracies Redistribute More Than Others. American Political Science Review 100, pp. 165-181.

Noam Lupu and Jonas Pontusson. 2011. The Structure of Inequality and the Politics of Redistribution. American Political Science Review, May,pp. 316-336.

Rosa Mulé. 1998. Does Democracy Promote Equality? Democratization, 5, pp. 1-22.

8.9.10. Political economy responses to international economic crises: 1929-1973-2007

Peter Gourevitch. 1986. Politics in Hard Times. Ithaca, Cornell University Press, chapter 1 and chapters on 1929 and 1973 economic crises.

Rosa Mulé and Günter Walzenbach. 2017. Striking a Balance? Comparative and International Political Economy in Times of Crisis, in E. Baroncelli and R. Mulé eds. The political economy of crisis and change in the new global context, Egea, Milan.

Jonas Pontusson and D. Raess. 2012. How (and Why) Is This Time Different? The Politics of Economic Crisis in Western Europe and the United States, Annual Review of Political Science.

Readings/Bibliography

Course design and objectives

The course is designed to explore the frontiers of interaction between politics and economics by engaging comparative research on varieties of political economies. It focuses on approaches that conceptualise different models of capitalism and investigates the role of political actors, institutions and interest groups in shaping and transforming these models.

The course is structured around two key questions: To what extent do differences in institutional settings shape fundamentally different models of democratic capitalism? What is the role of institutions, firms and labour unions in determining the different arrangements we find in capitalist countries?

Learning outcomes

At the end of the course students will be able to:

  • Analyse and compare national political economies
  • Critically evaluate political economic outcomes
  • Understand the institutional foundations of comparative advantage

Course procedure and evaluation

Students are encouraged to actively participate during the classes. They are required to prepare short group presentations and to hand in one question per week to stimulate discussions.

Participation in class will count for 25% of the grade

Written paper will count for 75% of the grade (3000 words). Deadline for paper : 4 January 2020.

  1. Introduction

    Hall, Peter A. 1997. The Role of Interests, Institutions and Ideas in the Political Economy of Industrialized Nations” In Lichbach, Mark I. and Zuckerman, Alan S. eds., Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure. Cambridge, New York etc.: Cambridge University Press, pp. 174-207.

    Further reading

    Clift, B. 2014 Comparative Political Economy. States, Markets and Global Capitalism, Palgrave MacMillan.

    Georg Menz, Comparative Political Economy, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2017

  2. The classical debate

Gerschenkron, Alexander. 1962. Economic Backwardness in Historical Perspective: A Book of Essays. Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, pp. 5-30.

Katzenstein, Peter J. 1985. Small States in World Markets: Industrial Policy in Europe. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press; chapter 1 and parts of chapter 3, pp. 17-38, 80-104.

3. Globalisation and comparative political economy

Mann, M. 1997, Has globalization ended the rise and rise of the nation-state? Review of International Political Economy, 4.

Rommel, T. and Walter, S. 2018. The Electoral Consequences of Offshoring: How the Globalization of Production Shapes Party Preferences, Comparative Political Studies, 51, 5, pp.621-658.

Hay, C. 2011. Globalisation’s impact on states, I.J. Ravenhill ed. Global political economy, Oxford, Oxford University Press, pp. 312-44.

4. Comparing countries

Sartori, G. 1994. Compare Why and How. Comparing, miscomparing and the comparative method, in Dogan, M. K and Kazancigil, A. (eds.) Comparing nations: concepts, strategies and substance, Oxford, Basil Blackwell.

5. Varieties of Capitalism:

Hall, P. and Soskice, D. 2001. An Introduction to Varieties of Capitalism, in P. Hall and D. Soskice, eds. Varieties of Capitalism. Oxford University Press, pp. 1-68.

6. Comparative labour markets

Fleckenstein, T. and Lee, S. 2017. The Politics of Labor Market Reform in Coordinated Welfare Capitalism: Comparing Sweden, Germany, and South Korea. World Politics,

Bearce, D., and Hart, A. 2017. International Labor Mobility and the Variety of Democratic Political Institutions. International Organization, 71, pp. 65-95.

Lallement, M. 2011. Europe and the economic crisis: forms of labour market adjustment and varieties of capitalism, Work, employment and society, 25, pp. 627-641.

Zartaloudis, S. and A. Kornelakis. 2017. Flexicurity between Europeanization and Varieties of Capitalism? A Comparative Analysis of Employment Protection Reforms in Portugal and Greece. Journal of Common Market Studies, 55, pp.1144-1161.

7. Comparing inequality trends

Anthony B. Atkinson. 2015. Inequality. What Can Be Done? Harvard University Press: 263-280.

François Bourguignon. 2015. The Globalization of Inequality, Princeton University Press, pp. 75-116.

Iversen, T. and D. Soskice. 2006. Electoral Institutions and the Politics of Coalitions: Why Some Democracies Redistribute More Than Others. American Political Science Review 100, pp. 165-181.

Noam Lupu and Jonas Pontusson. 2011. The Structure of Inequality and the Politics of Redistribution. American Political Science Review, May,pp. 316-336.

Rosa Mulé. 1998. Does Democracy Promote Equality? Democratization, 5, pp. 1-22.

8.9.10. Political economy responses to international economic crises: 1929-1973-2007

Peter Gourevitch. 1986. Politics in Hard Times. Ithaca, Cornell University Press, chapter 1 and chapters on 1929 and 1973 economic crises.

Rosa Mulé and Günter Walzenbach. 2017. Striking a Balance? Comparative and International Political Economy in Times of Crisis, in E. Baroncelli and R. Mulé eds. The political economy of crisis and change in the new global context, Egea, Milan.

Jonas Pontusson and D. Raess. 2012. How (and Why) Is This Time Different? The Politics of Economic Crisis in Western Europe and the United States, Annual Review of Political Science.

Teaching methods

lectures and interactive seminars.

Assessment methods

For students attending at least 70% of the classes: Participation in class will count for 25% of the grade.

Written paper will count for 75% of the grade (3000 words). Deadline for paper : 4 January 2020.

Students not attending the classes or attending less than 70% of the classes will be assessed with an oral exam.

Teaching tools

slides, documentaries, newspaper articles, videos

Office hours

See the website of Rosa Mulè