Foto del docente

Gabriele Matteo D'Uva

Associate Professor

Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine - DIMES

Academic discipline: BIO/11 Molecular Biology

Research

Keywords: heart regeneration heart development Cardiotoxicity of anticancer therapies Cell differentiation and dedifferentiation Breast cancer

Research line 1: Novel molecular strategies for cardiac regeneration

Heart dysfunction as a consequence of severe damages, such those induced by myocardial infarction, is a crucial public health problem and a leading cause of death in the western world today.

The aim of the studies carried out by our research group is to identify novel strategies for heart regeneration following severe damages, by direct stimulation of cell dedifferentiation, cell cycle re-entry and proliferation of endogenous cardiac muscle cells (cardiomyocytes).

This project involves the evaluation of differentiation status and proliferation of cardiomyocytes following the administration of specific stimuli (hormones, cytokines, growth factors...) or gene manipulation, and the analysis of the downstream molecular mechanisms.

 

Research Line 2: Novel strategies to reduce the cardiotoxic effects of anticancer therapies

A common side effect of chemotherapy and targeted therapies is cardio-toxicity, strongly impacting on the quality of life and the overall survival, regardless of the oncological prognosis. 

The aim of the studies carried out by our research group is to elucidate the role of ERBB ligands and receptors in the regulation of cardiotoxic side effects of anti-HER2 anticancer therapies.

This project will use a combination of molecular-, cell- and systems-biology methodologies in cellular models in vitro and in vivo.

 

Research Line 3: Novel strategies to inhibit breast cancer progression and dissemination

These past decades have witnessed the impressive advances in the comprehension of the role of growth factor receptors of ErbB family (EGFR/ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4) in development and progression of a variety of solid cancers.

The aim of the studies carried out by our research group is to elucidate the role of ERBB ligands and receptors in the regulation of breast cancer cell differentiation, along with the impact on tumor dissemination and metastasis formation.

This project will use a combination of molecular-, cell- and systems-biology methodologies in cellular models in vitro and in vivo.

Latest news

At the moment no news are available.