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Paola Subacchi

Professoressa a contratto

Vicepresidenza della Scuola di Scienze politiche - Bologna

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74570 - EUROPE AND THE GLOBAL ECONOMY   READING LIST FOR THOSE STUDENTS WHO ATTENDED MOST LECTURES (STUDENTI FREQUENTANTI)

74570 - EUROPE AND THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

READING LIST FOR THOSE STUDENTS WHO ATTENDED MOST LECTURES (STUDENTI FREQUENTANTI)

Overview

The course offers an overview of Europe’s model of economic integration and explores how this model responds to the challenges of a more competitive global market place. The key question - and the course’s overall theme - is whether the euro crisis and the subsequent sluggish economic growth have seriously undermined confidence in the European single market’s ability to deliver prosperity for all.

 

Module II

Module II is concentrated over three weeks in March and in early April. There will be two sets of lectures (of three hours each) in the first week of March (2 and 3 March) followed by three sets of lectures in the last week of March (29, 30 and 31 March) followed by final two sets of lectures in the first week of April (6 and 7 April).

The module aims to furnish students with notions and analytical tools, so that they can critically assess recent events and follow the current debate on Europe’s economic future.

 

Outline

 

  1. Economic integration in Europe
    1. history, facts and institutions
    2. the microeconomics of European integration
    3. EU micro policies

 

Reading

Richard Baldwin, The Economics of European Integration (London: McGraw Hill Education, fifth edition, 2015), the following chapters:

Chapters 1, 2 and 3 (historical and institutional background)

Chapter 4 and 5 (microeconomic tools and the essential economics of preferential liberalization)

Chapter 6 (growth effects and factor market integration)

Chapter 8 (economic integration, labour markets and migration)

European Commission, The European Union explained: Trade (European Commission, Directorate General for Communication, Brussels, 2014) http://europa.eu/pol/pdf/flipbook/en/trade_en.pdf

 

  1. Europe and the changing dynamics of the world economy
    1. trade integration
    2. foreign direct investment and financial globalization
    3. demographics, migration and productivity growth

Reading

OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development), Moving Up the Value Chain: Staying Competitive in the Global Economy (Paris, 2007), https://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/38558080.pdf

Part 1, Chapter 1.2, Drivers of Long-Run Prosperity: Laying the Foundations for an Updated Global Competitiveness Index, pp.43-61, in World Economic Forum, The Global Competitiveness Report, 2015-2016 (Geneva: World Economic Forum, 2015), http://www3.weforum.org/docs/gcr/2015-2016/Global_Competitiveness_Report_2015-2016.pdf

 

  1. Europe and the others
    1. the US and transatlantic relations
    2. the rise of China
    3. the other BRICs
    4. emerging markets and developing countries

 

Reading

Chapters 1 and 2, pp. 1-11, Daniel S. Hamilton and Joseph P. Quinlan, The Transatlantic Economy 2017 (Washington DC: Centre for Transatlantic Relations, 2017) http://transatlanticrelations.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/170223_FULL-BOOK-2.pdf

Jim O’ Neill, The growth map. Economic opportunity in the BRICs and beyond (London: Portfolio Penguin, 2011), chapter 2 (pp. 25-43) and chapter 3 (pp. 45-98). [these chapters have been uploaded in ‘Materiali didattici’ on AlmaCampus]


Pubblicato il: 24 aprile 2017