78168 - Medieval and Modern Architecture (1) (LM)

Course Unit Page

Academic Year 2018/2019

Learning outcomes

After completing the course, the student acquires necessary knowledge to read and critically interpret the medieval and modern architecture. In particular, the student has the methodological tools for the historical and critical understanding of the territory, the city and its major architectures.

Course contents

SIXTEENTH CENTURY ITALIAN ARCHITECTURE

Syllabus

Lesson one,

Introduction and organization.

Lesson two,

The architectural orders and the classical language of architecture

Bibliography:

  • C. Thoenes, Gli ordini architettonici, rinascita o invenzione?, in Roma e l’antico nell’arte e nella cultura del Cinquecento, a cura di M. Fagiolo, Roma: Biblioteca internazionale di cultura 1985, pp. 261-271 (PDF uploaded on IOL)

Lesson three

Innovaton and tradition: Filippo Brunelleschi

Bibliography:

  • L. Heydenreich, Brunelleschi, in Architecture in Italy 1400-1500, edited by P. Davies, New Haven & London: Yale University Press 1996, pp. 13-33.
  • Id., Florence 1450-1480, in ibidem, pp. 45-54.
  • A. Bruschi, Brunelleschi e la nuova architettura fiorentina, in Storia dell’architettura italiana, cit., pp. 38-106.

Lesson four

Architecture and Theoury: Leon Battista Alberti

Bibliography:

    • H. Burns, Leon Battista Alberti, in Storia dell’architettura italiana, cit., pp. 114-165.

Lesson five

Rome, January 1, 1500

  • Bibliography:

  • Bruschi, L’architettura a Roma negli ultimi anni del pontificato di Alessandro VI Borgia (1492-1503) e l’edilizia del primo Cinquecento, in Storia dell’architettura italiana. Il primo Cinquecento, a cura di A. Bruschi, Milano: Electa 2002, pp. 34-75.
  • W. Lotz, Architettura classica a Roma: Bramante, in Architettura in Italia 1500-1600, a cura di D. Howard, Milano: Rizzoli 1997, pp.11-13.

Lesson six

Bramante and Giulio II

Bibliography:

  • W. Lotz, Edifici per Giulio II, in Architettura in Italia 1500-1600, a cura di D. Howard, Milano: Rizzoli 1997, pp. 13-23.
  • C.L. Frommel, La città come opera d’arte: Bramante e Raffaello (1500-1520), in Storia dell’architettura italiana. Il primo Cinquecento, pp. 76-99.

Lesson seven

The post-bramantesque generation. Raphael and Giulio Romano

Bibliography:

  • W. Lotz, Architettura classica a Roma: Raffaello, in Architettura in Italia 1500-1600, cit., pp. 27-34.
  • W. Lotz, Giulio Romano, in Architettura in Italia 1500-1600, cit., pp. 76-82.
  • C.L. Frommel, La città come opera d’arte: Bramante e Raffaello (1500-1520), in Storia dell’architettura italiana. Il primo Cinquecento, pp. 99-131.

Lesson eight

The post-brantesque generation. Baldassarre Peruzzi

Bibliography:

  • W. Lotz, Baldassarre Peruzzi e Antonio da Sangallo il Giovane, in Architettura in Italia 1500-1600, cit., pp. 44-51.
  • F.P. Fiore, Roma, le diverse maniere, in Storia dell’architettura italiana. Il primo Cinquecento, pp. 132-136.

Lesson nine

Antonio da Sangallo the Younger and the "Sangallesque Sect"

Bibliography:

  • W. Lotz, Baldassarre Peruzzi e Antonio da Sangallo il Giovane, in Architettura in Italia 1500-1600, cit., pp. 52-60.
  • F.P. Fiore, Roma, le diverse maniere, in Storia dell’architettura italiana. Il primo Cinquecento, pp. 136-140.
  • A. Bruschi, Roma, dal Sacco al tempo di Paolo III, in ibidem, pp. 160-207.

Lesson ten

The architecture of Michelangelo

  • Bibliography:

  • W. Lotz, Michelangelo, in Architettura in Italia 1500-1600, cit., pp. 89-106.

Lesson eleven

The magnificent construction. The New Saint Peter

Bibliography:

  • W. Lotz, I progetti di San Pietro dopo la morte di Bramante, in Architettura in Italia 1500-1600, cit., pp. 23-25.
  • A. Bruschi, Roma, dal Sacco al tempo di Paolo III, in Storia dell’architettura italiana. Il primo Cinquecento, parti relative ai progetti e alla costruzione di San Pietro.

Lesson twelve

Florence in the first half of the Sixteenth Century

Bibliography:

C. Elam, Firenze 1500-50, in Storia dell’architettura italiana. Il primo Cinquecento, pp. 208-239.

Lesson thirteen 

Bologna: from the Signoria Bentivoglio and the consequence of Julius II's conquest  

 Bibliography:

M. Ricci, Bologna e Carpi, in Storia dell’architettura italiana. Il primo Cinquecento, pp. 306-312.

Lesson fourteen

Andrea Palladio

  • Bibliography:

  • W. Lotz, Andrea Palladio, in Architettura in Italia 1500-1600, cit., pp. 147-158.

Lesson fifteen

Conclusion

Date TBA but after the end of the scheduled classes

Field trip to Rome or Florence

 

Readings/Bibliography

The following are the textbooks containing the mandatory essays which pages are indicated in the above syllabus, class by class (all books are located in the department Library I. Supino at Santa Cristina)

  • Storia dell’Architettura Italiana. Il Quattrocento, a cura di F.P. Fiore, Milano: Electa 1998.
  • Storia dell’Architettura Italiana. Il primo Cinquecento, a cura di A. Bruschi, Milano: Electa 2002
  • L. Heidenreich, Architecture in Italy 1400-1500, revised by Paul Davies, New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 1996
  • W. Lotz, Architecture in Italy 1500-1600, revised by Deborah Howard, New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 1996

    Extra bibliography will be suggested class by class. Beyond the mandatory readings the following bibliography is strongly recommend (all books are available at Unibo library system)

  • L.B. Alberti, L’Architettura, Milano: Il Polifilo 1989, libro I, V, VI e VII,
    • R. Weiss, La scoperta dell’antichità classica nel Rinascimento, traduzione di Maria Teresa Bindella, Padova: Antenore, 1989 (prima edizione, Oxford B. Blackwell 1969).
    • R. Wittkower, Principi architettonici nell’età dell’Umanesimo, Torino: Einaudi 1988 (o altra edizione).
  • M. Tafuri, Ricerca del Rinascimento, principi, città, architetti, Torino: Einaudi 1992.

Teaching methods

The course is offered during the first five weeks of the second semester (Spring) in a 30 hours block divided in 15 lessons of two hours each, three times a week, corresponding to to 6 CFU.

In order not to disturb the instructor and the students is strictly required to take a seat in the classroom before the beginning of class. It is a good manner not to bring any kind of food in class and eating during the lesson. I am fully available and happy to answer to any question you might have during and after class. A good grade also depends on a regular presence in class and on a active participation.

Assessment methods

The final exam is an interview equal for both attending and non-attending students. The interview is based on the mandatory bibliography specified in the syllabus and seeks to verify the student’s critical and methodological skills acquired during the course. Non-attending students are required to write a 7/8 pages long paper on a topic included in the syllabus (but a different topic is also welcomed) to be approved by the instructor. The paper should be submitted in a PDF format no later than the Saturday before the last week of class.

During the interview the student must show the acquisition of the knowledge of main topics discussed in class as well as the mastering of the methods and critical tools acquired during the course. Pictures identifications of monuments (description, what it is, architect, date, location and why is important) and their broader context are crucial requirements for the success of the exam.

For this reason is strongly recommended a careful study of the iconographical material distributed class by class which can be also downloaded from the instructor’s website: https://www.unibo.it/sitoweb/f.benelli

Grade breakdown

1. 30L/28, the highest range of grade, is given when the student shows to be able to deeply, critically and creatively analyze the texts and the images and to put them in the broader context. Special attention is given to the articulation with which the student presents and delivers his ideas during the interview.

2. 24/27 is the range of grade given to the student that shows only a mnemonic knowledge of the material and delivers his interview with a fairly proper language at times inappropriate.

3. 18/23 is the range of grade that reflects a sufficient or superficial knowledge and critical understanding of the material.

4. Lower than 18: Lacunae, inappropriate language skills, lack of mastering the material will result into a failing grade.

Teaching tools

Pdf texts and images of the illustrations showed in class. Additional bibliography when needed.

Office hours

See the website of Francesco Benelli