02493 - International Relations

Course Unit Page

SDGs

This teaching activity contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Quality education Reduced inequalities Climate Action Peace, justice and strong institutions

Academic Year 2018/2019

Learning outcomes

The course deals with some basic themes, concepts and thinkers in international relations. The purpose is to provide students with essential conceptual and linguistic tools for understanding the underlying structure and fundamental features of international politics, as well as its material and immaterial changing aspects.  The objective is to explain the dynamics through which men and women understand international politics as well as on achieving a coherent capacity of thinking international life, both in its theoretical and practical dimension.

Course contents

The course consists of seven topics:

I. International Relations as a Field of Western Knowledge

II. A Fundamental Theoretical Framework: Realism/Idealism

III. War and Ways of Peace

IV. Beyond Domestic Analogy. Justice and Order in World Politics

V. The International Political Space  

VI. Homogeneity, Heterogeneity and Conflict

VII. The Global Age and International Relations

Each course topic includes required readings. Texts marked by an asterisk (*) are available on line at the materiale didattico web site. To access these texts, students must subscribe the Unibo digital list titled michele.chiaruzzi.ri

Readings/Bibliography

I. International Relations as a Field of Western Knowledge

Required Readings:   
1. Richard Devetak, An Introduction to International Relations, in Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 1-18.  
2. Jim George, International Relations Theory in an Age of Critical Diversity, in Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 22-34.    
3. Martin Wight, Why is There no International Theory?, in International Relationsvol. 2, 1960, pp. 35-48.* 
4. Raymond Aron, Qu'est-ce qu'une théorie des relations internationales?, in Revue française de science politique, n. 5, 1997, pp. 837-861. *    

II. A Fundamental Theoretical Framework: Realism/Idealism

Required Readings:
1. Hans J. Morgenthau, Six Principles of Political Realism, in H.J. Morgenthau, Politics Among Nations. The Struggle for Power and Peace, New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1978, pp. 4-15.*     
2. Edward H. Carr, The Twenty Years's Crisis, Palgrave, Basingstoke, 2001, pp. 42-88.   
3. Leonard Woolf, Utopia and Reality , in «Political Quarterly», vol. 11, n. 2, 1940, pp. 167-182. *   
4. James Richardson, Liberalism, in Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 48-60. 
5. Michele Chiaruzzi, Realism, in Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 35-48.  
  
III. War and Ways of Peace

Required readings:
1. Kenneth Waltz, Man, the Stateand War, New York, Columbia University, 1959, chapters II, IV, VI, VIII. 
2. Martin Wight, The Balance of Power and International Order, in A. James (ed.), The Bases of International Order, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1973, pp. 85-115.*
3. Marco Cesa, Great Powers, in Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 268-79.
4. Ian Hurd, The United Nations, in Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 268-79.

IV. Beyond the Domestic Analogy. Justice and Order in World Politics

Required Readings:
1. Hedley Bull,   The Anarchical Society , London: Macmillan, 1995.


V. The International Political Space

Required Readings:
1. Raymond Aron, On Space, in Raymond Aron, Peace and War, New Jeresy, Transaction Publisher, Chapter VII. 
2. Ladis K. D. Kristof, The Origins and Evolution of Geopolitics, in «The Journal of Conflict Resolution», vol. 4, no. 1, 1960, pp. 15-51.*    


VI. Homogeneity, Heterogeneity and Conflict

Required Readings:
1. Raymond Aron, On International Systems, in Raymond Aron, Peace and War, New Jeresy, Transaction Publisher, Chapter IV. 
2. Michael W. Doyle, Kant, Liberal Legacies, and Foreign Affairs, in  Philosophy & Public Affairs, vol. 12, no. 3, 1983, pp. 205-235.*
3. Cristopher Layne, Kant or Cant?, in International Security, vol. 19, no, 2, 1994, pp. 5-49.*


VII. The Global Age and International Life

Required Readings:
1. Sara E. Davies, Migration and Refugees, in Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 268-79, pp. 450-461. 
2. Steven Slaughter, Globalisation and Its Critics, in Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 386-97.
3.  James Goodman, Non-State Actors, in Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 310-21.

Texts marked with an asterisk* are available on line at the materiale didattico web site. To access these texts students must subscribe the Unibo digital list titled michele.chiaruzzi.ri

Other texts are available at Bologna libraries, including the Johns Hopkins University library (via Belmeloro, 10).

Teaching methods

Traditional lectures. Students must subscribe the  list called michele.chiaruzzi.ri Attendance is expected at all lectures and verified. All news on the course as well as final examination will be published  on line: please check the  sito web docente.

Assessment methods

Attending students

Written exam based on 10 questions. Oral exam is voluntary.
International Relations course will be concluded at the end of December. It includes a mid-term written exam in November as well as a final exam at the end of December based on lectures and a part of required readings according to the syllabus. Students are considered not attending students if they are absent for more than four lessons in each study term (September-October/November-December). The exams are based on ten written questions. Time availabe is 60'. A correct answer counts maximun three points. The final vote will be based on the mid-term and final exam results. Then, students  can opt for an oral exam or save their written exam result. During the exam students can use their favourite languages among Italian, English, French, Spanish as well as a dictionary. If students fail to achieve a final positive evaluation, they could opt for an oral exam based on not attending students required readings.

Not attending students

Not attending students can opt for an oral exam during standard exam sessions.  They will study the folllowing volumes:

1) Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, and Jim George (eds), An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2017.

2) Filippo Andreatta (ed), Classic Works in International Relations, Il Mulino, on line at https://www.pandoracampus.it/store/details/10.978.8815/332899

3) Michele Chiaruzzi, Martin Wight on Fortune and Irony in Politics, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.

Teaching tools

The students will follow, for the duration of the course, the Radio 3 Mondo radio program, also available in podcast.
Each course topic includes required readings. Texts marked by an asterisk (*) are available on line at the materiale didattico web site. To access these texts and enroll in the course, students must subscribe the Unibo digital list titled michele.chiaruzzi.ri 

News and information on the course as well as examinations results will be published on line. Please always check the sito web docente.

Links to further information

https://unibo.academia.edu/MicheleChiaruzzi

Office hours

See the website of Michele Chiaruzzi